Symphyotrichum novae-angliae (New England Aster)-HAVE SEEDS



USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British Possessions. 3 vols. Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York. Vol. 3: 417.

WILD SEED PROJECT IS OFFERING SEEDS, SO THIS SPECIES IS NOT A PRIORITY.

Where Commonly Found: Meadows, fields, disturbed areas, CT, MA, ME, NH, NY, RI, VT.
How to Identify:
(For unfamiliar words: Wikipedia Glossary of Botanical Terms).
Go Botany Key to Symphyotrichum novae-angliae
Missouri Botanical Garden webpage for: Symphyotrichum novae-angliae.
Flower Type:  Clusters of composite flowers, about 1-1/2″ across, appear at the ends of upper stems, with numerous gold of yellow disk florets surrounded by 30 or more purple, lavender or light pink ray florets in mid-August to ;ate September.
Leaf Arrangement: 
Alternate leaves along a central stem that occasionally branches near the top.  The stems are covered in short white hairs.
Leaf Type: 
Lanceolate or oblong leaves, up to 4″ long and 1″ wide, become smaller up the stem, are pubescent with smooth but ciliate margins, and clasp the stem at leaf base.
Height:  
3′ – 6′
Seed Collection:  Achemes about 1/16″ long, very hairy with plume hairs attached all over.

Attracts:
 Bees, Butterflies, Larval Host
Use:  Garden or Naturalizing
Light:  Full Sun
Hardiness Zone:  4 to 8   USDA Zone Map
Soils:  Moist
Notes:  New England Aster is provides great late flowers for bees, butterflies and as a larval host for the Crescent Butterfly.  Nice in the back of any garden.
Native to all of US (except ID, NV, AZ, TX, LA, FL).   Biota of North America Program (BONAP) – North America Plant Atlas (NAPA).

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